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Cubs expect Bradley resolution shortly

Bradley resolution expected soon

MILWAUKEE -- Cubs general manager Jim Hendry said Tuesday he expects to resolve all issues regarding Milton Bradley's suspension in the next few days.

Hendry suspended Bradley on Sunday for the remainder of the season following comments by the outfielder in which he criticized the Cubs, the fans and the media. The Major League Baseball Players Union said it was considering filing a grievance on Bradley's behalf. The outfielder is expected to be paid for the final 15 games that he will miss.

"We don't anticipate any problems," Hendry said. "We'll have it all worked out in the next few days."

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Bradley, who batted .257 with 12 homers and 40 RBIs, still has two years remaining on his contract with the Cubs and is owed about $21 million over that time period. The team will try to move him this offseason. Perhaps he would consider returning to Texas, where he hit .321 last season?

"He was awesome," Rangers manager Ron Washington said of the 2008 season with the mercurial outfielder. "He did a great job for me. It wasn't my first rodeo with Milton. I never had a problem with Milton. If I didn't like something, I just let him know. All Milton wants is someone to be honest with him. He's no dummy. He knows when he screws up.

"I know things didn't go well in Chicago. I'm sorry to hear that. I felt he could be a good force for them."

Cubs pitcher Ted Lilly, who is the team's player rep, said he doesn't expect to be contacted by the players' union regarding Bradley's possible grievance.

"They wouldn't come to me and ask me questions on something like this," Lilly said. "I don't think it's anything I would have any say in, nor do I know what goes into circumstances like this. I don't know the process or the rules. Fortunately, I've never been through it."

Lilly has other things on his mind.

"I'm trying to work on a backdoor slider right now," Lilly said.

Carrie Muskat is a reporter for MLB.com. This story was not subject to the approval of Major League Baseball or its clubs.

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